The Flag Shop Jumps on Board with the CURE Foundation’s National Denim Day!

We Wore Our Denim and Raised $377.10     

Yesterday, May 15th, was the CURE Foundation’s National Denim Day, and the team at The Flag Shop Vancouver jumped on board to join the fight against cancer. Many wore denim to work, as well as the signature pink ribbon, making personal donations in support of breast cancer research and prevention. National Denim Day creates awareness and provides resources for the foundation to explore all possible avenues in the battle against cancer, so that no lives are lost due to a lack of funding.[1]

The team was treated to a special lunch by The Flag Shop President, Susan Braverman, to encourage a day of giving, team unity, and fun. She said, “We all have a cancer story and we’ve all been touched by cancer, in some way. National Denim Day gave us a chance to do something as a team to join the fight!” She added, “On top of encouraging my staff to donate what they could, the company matched the team contribution!” The Flag Shop Vancouver raised $377.10 for the CURE Foundation’s National Denim Day campaign.

The first-ever National Denim Day took place 22 years ago in 1996, and continues each year on the first Tuesday after Mother’s Day. This campaign unifies more than 400,000 Canadians, of all ages, from all walks of life, who share a common understanding that together, we have the power to bring hope and change to those affected by breast cancer.[2]

Source: The CURE Foundation

The Reality of Cancer
According to Canadian Cancer Society statistics, in 2013 an estimated 23,800 new cases of breast cancer were diagnosed in women, with 200 cases in men. In 2013, 5,000 lost their lives to breast cancer.[3]

Cancer, in all its many forms, is the leading cause of death in Canada. According to Statistics Canada, in 2015 77,054 Canadians lost their lives to cancer (29.2% of all deaths that year), followed by heart disease (19.5%), and stroke (5.2%).[4]  These statistics reflect the harsh reality of cancer, and point to the critical role of awareness and prevention in keeping all Canadians healthy. Whether it’s about prevention, regular screenings, or treatment, the work of the CURE Foundation and other not-for-profit cancer agencies positively impacts the lives of those who have been affected by cancer.

For more than 40 years, The Flag Shop has been proudly supporting not-for-profit cancer awareness, research, and prevention organizations, such as the CURE Foundation, the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, the CIBC Run for the Cure, the Canadian Cancer Society, and the BC Cancer Agency, and many others, sharing a long and rewarding history.

Getting Your Message Across with Beautiful Banners
We know our street banners, that’s for sure! And, it’s our privilege to support organizations whose daily work is focused on fighting cancer and other serious illnesses. At The Flag Shop, our banners are manufactured in our production facility on Powell Street, in Vancouver. Our goal is to make things easy and hassle-free, so we also install, remove, wash and store the banners for future use. This not only saves money, but it’s socially responsible because it means the banners can be re-used, reducing waste, and keeping them out of landfills sites.

Source: socialcrustcafe.com

A Special Thank You!
Thank you to Social Crust Cafe & Catering for yesterday’s delicious lunch! Social Crust is a social enterprise launched by Coast Mental Health. Employees are graduates of the Coast Mental Health’s Culinary Training Program, which creates training and employment opportunities for at-risk young adults facing employment obstacles.[4]

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References:

[1][2][3] https://www.curefoundation.com/national-denim-day/
[4] http://www.statcan.gc.ca/tables-tableaux/sum-som/l01/cst01/hlth36a-eng.htm

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